I would love to have lunch with a friend!

I would love to have lunch with a friend!

(Source: the-healing-nest, via runnergirlwannabemama)

newsweek:

For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.

In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.

“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.

See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649

food52:

Messy in the best way.

Read more: How to Make Mud Pie on Food52.

Oh this looks define! I might need to find a reason to make this very soon!
"My heart wants roots. My mind wants wings. I cannot bear their bickerings."

— E. Y. Harburg (via missaira)

(Source: king-atlas, via brittanickel)

jtotheizzoe:

crownedrose:

Today is so exciting for a ton of fellow palaeontologists, students, researchers, and myself… Dreadnoughtus has finally been published!

The video above gives you guys a bit of history to where this titanosaur was discovered back in 2005. Almost ten years later and it’s finally gone public! With a name like Dreadnoughtus, it’s hard not to want to run around saying its awesome name.

These fossils spent a lot of time being excavated out of the matrix they were found in; around 4 years with multiple labs working tirelessly to clean and repair them. We had to get it done at least in some sort of quick time, right? With such a huge specimen, a lot of man power is required!

I’m so proud and happy for everyone involved that we can now share this gorgeous dinosaur to the public! It’s MASSIVE. The fossils are just mind blowing to look at, and now we continue to move forward with its preservation, education, and further research. It’ll be going back to Argentina next year.

You can read the article about Dreadnoughtus here on Drexel University’s website, and the scientific paper on Nature.com (which some super awesome people I know worked on).

Behold, the behemoth!

Meet the new (and aptly named) dinosaur species Dreadnoughtus, the most complete fossil of a massive sauropod ever unearthed, a creature so large and formidable that it was essentially invincible to the predators of its time, a dinosaur likely heavier than a 12-pack of bull elephants (and well heftier than a Boeing 737), a titan whose femur stood as high as me (and I’m no shrimp).

Scientists aren’t ready to say that this was the largest land animal EVAR, but it’s definitely the most massive creature that we have good data for. The completeness of this skeleton is simply remarkable!  Paleontologists rarely find this many bones from the same single specimen. Some other sauropods may have in fact been more massive than Dreadnoughtus, but those bigger estimates are based on just a handful of bones. Well, not a handful, more like a truckful, but you get the idea. 

When you’re done with the video above, head on over to National Geographic to read Brian Switek’s great summary of the news. Just imagine, if we’re still uncovering new species like this giant after centuries of sifting through the upper crust of Earth, imagine what else lies undiscovered…

Keep digging!

This is very cool! I want to be a Paleontologist when I grow up!

thedoughnutvault:

Quick Specials Update: Dreamsicle old fashioneds will be taking center stage for tomorrow, Friday, September 5.

I miss Chicago!!!

newsweek:

Meat is a nasty business, filled with blood, guts and, yes, shit. While there’s nothing in the U.S. today that matches the hellish conditions described in Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle at the turn of the last century, there is no avoiding the fact that if we want to eat meat, we need to do things that are stomach-churning for the average person: kill things, cut them up, pack the pieces into containers and ship them out. 

We’ve all done an excellent job of hiding this process from our daily lives. In the time we’ve moved out of the country and into cities and suburbs (in 1910, 72 percent of Americans lived in rural areas; in 2010, only 16 percent did), we’ve both literally and emotionally distanced ourselves from the provenance of our dinners. 

In her book on the history of meat production in the U.S., In Meat We Trust, Maureen Ogle notes that as early as 1870s, city dwellers were desperate to get the dirty business of the slaughterhouse off their cobblestone streets. And as cities became less industrialized and more “refined,” the sight and smell of slaughter became even less tolerable. 

So we drove meat production into the hinterlands, in the process encouraging the growth of massive meat conglomerates that did much more than simply process: They grew, slaughtered, processed, shipped and marketed. 

To keep up with demand, they used all the resources they could marshall to become ever more efficient at these tasks. In 2010, we consumed 34,156,000 metric tons of the stuff total. Per person, we average 270.7 pounds of meat per year, well above the world average of 102.5 pounds and second only to tiny Luxembourg. 

Can Mass Meat Be Both Cheap and Safe?



We need to stop eating so much meat!

newsweek:

Meat is a nasty business, filled with blood, guts and, yes, shit. While there’s nothing in the U.S. today that matches the hellish conditions described in Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle at the turn of the last century, there is no avoiding the fact that if we want to eat meat, we need to do things that are stomach-churning for the average person: kill things, cut them up, pack the pieces into containers and ship them out.

We’ve all done an excellent job of hiding this process from our daily lives. In the time we’ve moved out of the country and into cities and suburbs (in 1910, 72 percent of Americans lived in rural areas; in 2010, only 16 percent did), we’ve both literally and emotionally distanced ourselves from the provenance of our dinners.

In her book on the history of meat production in the U.S., In Meat We Trust, Maureen Ogle notes that as early as 1870s, city dwellers were desperate to get the dirty business of the slaughterhouse off their cobblestone streets. And as cities became less industrialized and more “refined,” the sight and smell of slaughter became even less tolerable.

So we drove meat production into the hinterlands, in the process encouraging the growth of massive meat conglomerates that did much more than simply process: They grew, slaughtered, processed, shipped and marketed.

To keep up with demand, they used all the resources they could marshall to become ever more efficient at these tasks. In 2010, we consumed 34,156,000 metric tons of the stuff total. Per person, we average 270.7 pounds of meat per year, well above the world average of 102.5 pounds and second only to tiny Luxembourg.

Can Mass Meat Be Both Cheap and Safe?

We need to stop eating so much meat!
I try to remember this each and everyday!

I try to remember this each and everyday!

(Source: in-catz-we-trust, via runnergirlwannabemama)

gettingtoparis:

winedinelaw:

tehinterwebz:

"You can’t really cut out soda or junk food, because those were never your vices to begin with, so your first line of attack when it comes to reducing simple calories has to be things like “crusty bread” or “wonderful soft cheeses,” or even “ordering dessert,” which are all impossible to sacrifice."

So me

yes… to all of the above.

(Source: littlejandthecity)

food52:

If there’s anything worth getting excited about for fall, it’s apple cider donuts.
(Spiced Cider Doughnuts via Williams-Sonoma)

I’m not ready for summer to be over but these yummy things might help the pain!

food52:

If there’s anything worth getting excited about for fall, it’s apple cider donuts.

(Spiced Cider Doughnuts via Williams-Sonoma)

I’m not ready for summer to be over but these yummy things might help the pain!